maven: good ideas gone wrong

I’ve had plenty of time to reflect on the state of server side Java, technology, and life in general this week. The reason for all this extra ‘quality’ time was because I was stuck in an endless loop waiting for maven to do its thing, me observing it failed in subtly different ways, tweaking some more, and hitting arrow up+enter (repeat last command) and fiddling my thumbs for two more minutes. This is about as tedious as it sounds. Never mind the actual problem, I fixed it eventually. But the key thing to remember here is that I lost a week of my life on stupid book keeping.

On to my observations:

Enough whining, now on to the solutions.

Ultimately, maven is just a stop gap. And not even particularly good at what it does.

update 27 October 2009

Somebody produced a great study on how much time is spent on incremental builds with various build tools. This stuff backs my key argument up really well. The most startling out come:

Java developers spend 1.5 to 6.5 work weeks a year (with an average of 3.8 work weeks, or 152 hours, annually) waiting for builds, unless they are using Eclipse with compile-on-save.

I suspect that where I work, we’re close to 6.5 weeks. Oh yeah, they single out maven as the slowest option here:

It is clear from this chart that Ant and Maven take significantly more time than IDE builds. Both take about 8 minutes an hour, which corresponds to 13% of total development time. There seems to be little difference between the two, perhaps because the projects where you have to use Ant or Maven for incremental builds are large and complex.

So anyone who still doesn’t get what I’m talking about here, build tools like maven are serious time wasters. There exist tools out there that reduce this time to close to 0. I repeat, Pyhton Django = edit, F5, edit F5. No build/restart time whatsoever.