Mobile Linux

A lot has been written about mobile and embedded device platforms lately (aka. ‘phone’ platforms). Usually articles are about the usual incumbent platforms: Android, IOS, and Windows Phone and the handful of alternatives from e.g. RIM and others. Most of the debate seems to revolve around the question whether IOS will crush Android, or the other way around. Kind of a boring debate that generally involves a lot of fan boys from either camp highlighting this or that feature, the beautiful design, and other stuff.

Recently this three way battle (or two way battle really, depending on your views regarding Windows Phone), has gotten a lot more interesting. However, my in view this ‘war’ was actually concluded nearly a decade ago before it even started and mobile linux won in a very unambiguous way. What is really interesting is how this is changing the market right now.

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Using Elastic Search for geo-spatial search

Over the past few months we have been quietly working on the localstre.am platform. As I have mentioned in a previous post, we are using elastic search as a key value store and that’s working pretty nicely for us. In addition to that we are also using it as a geospatial search engine.

Localstrea.am is going to be all about local and that means geospatial data and lots of it. That’s not just POIs (points of interest) but also streets, cities, and areas of interest. In geospatial terms that means shapes: points, paths, and polygons. Doing geospatial search means searching through documents that have geospatial data associated with it using a query that also contains geospatial data. So given a shape, find every document with a shape that overlaps or intersects with it.

Since elastic search is still very new and rapidly evolving (especially the geospatial functionality), I had some worries about whether it would work as advertised. So, after months of coding it was about time to see if it could actually take a decent data set and work as advertised instead of falling over and dying in a horrible way.

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Puppet

I recently started preparing for deploying our localstre.am codebase to an actual server. So, that means I’m currently having a lot of fun picking up some new skills and playing system administrator (and being aware of my short comings there). World plus dog seems to be recommending using either Chef or Puppet for this  and since I know few good people that are into puppet in a big way and since I’ve seen it used in Nokia, I chose the latter.

After getting things to a usable state, I have a few observations that come from my background of having engineered systems for some time and having a general gut feeling about stuff being acceptable or not that I wanted to share.

  • The puppet syntax is weird. It’s a so-called ruby DSL that tries to look a bit like json and only partially succeeds. So you end up with a strange mix of : and => depending on the context. I might be nit picking here but I don’t think this a particularly well designed DSL. It feels more like a collection of evolved conventions for naming directories and files that happen to be backed by ruby. The conventions, naming, etc. are mostly non sensical. For example the puppet notion of a class is misleading. It’s not a class. It doesn’t have state and you don’t instantiate it. No objects are involved either. It’s more close to a ruby module. But in puppet, a module is actually a directory of puppet stuff (so more like a package). Ruby leaks through in lots of places anyway so why not stick with the conventions of that language? For example by using gems instead of coming up with your own convoluted notion of a package (aka module in puppet). It feels improvised and gobbled together. Almost like the people who built this had no clue what they were doing and changed their minds several times. Apologies for being harsh if that offended you BTW ;-).
  • The default setup of puppet (and chef) assumes a lot of middleware that doesn’t make any sense whatsoever for most smaller deployments (or big deployments IMNSHO). Seriously, I don’t want a message broker anywhere near my servers any time soon, especially not ActiveMQ. The so-called masterless (puppet) or solo (chef) setups are actually much more appropriate for most people.  They are more simple and have less moving parts. That’s a good thing when it comes to deployments.
  • It tries to be declarative. This is mostly a good thing but sometimes it is just nice to have an implicit order of things following from the order in which you specify things. Puppet forces you to be explicit about order and thus ends up being very verbose about this. Most of that verbosity is actually quite pointless. Sometimes A really comes before B if I specify it in that order in one file.
  • It’s actually quite verbose compared to the equivalent bash script when it comes to basic stuff like for example starting a service, copying a file from a to b, etc. Sometimes a “cp foo bar; chmod 644 bar” just kinda does the trick. It kind of stinks that you end up with these five line blobs for doing simple things like that. Why make that so tedious?
  • Like maven and ant in the Java world it, it tries to be platform agnostic but only partially succeeds. A lot of platform dependencies creep in any way and generally puppet templates are not very portable. Things like package names, file locations, service names, etc. end up being platform specific anyway.
  • Speaking of which, puppet is more like ant than like maven. Like ant, all puppet does is provide the means to do different things. It doesn’t actually provide a notion of a sensible default way that things are done that you then customize, which is what maven does instead. Not that I’m a big fan of maven but with puppet you basically have to baby sit the deployment and worry about all the silly little details that are (or should be) bog standard between deployments: creating users, setting up & managing ssh keys, ensuring processes run with the appropriate restrictions, etc. This is a lot of work and like a lot of IT stuff it feels repetitive and thus is a good candidate for automation. Wait … wasn’t puppet supposed to be that solution? The puppet module community provides some reusable stuff but its just bits and pieces really and not nearly enough for having a sensible production ready setup for even the simplest of applications. It doesn’t look like I could get much value out of that community.

So, I think puppet at this stage is a bit of a mixed bag and I still have to do a lot of work to actually produce a production ready system. Much more than I think is justified by the simplicity of real world setups that I’ve seen in the wild. Mostly running a ruby or java application is not exactly rocket science. So, why exactly does this stuff continue to be so hard & tedious despite a multi billion dollar industry trying to fix this for the last 20 years or so?

I don’t think puppet is the final solution in devops automation. It is simply too hard to do things with puppet and way too easy to get it wrong as well. There’s too much choice, a lack of sensible policy, and way too many pitfalls. It being an improvement at all merely indicates how shit things used to be.

Puppet feels more like a tool to finish the job that linux distributors apparently couldn’t be bothered to do in arbitrary ways than like a tool to produce reliable & reproducible production quality systems at this point and I could really use a tool that does the latter without the drama and attitude. What I need is sensible out of the box experience for the following use case: here’s a  war file, deploy that on those servers.

Anyway, I started puppetizing our system last week and have gotten it to the point where I can boot a bunch of vagrant virtual machines with the latest LTS ubuntu and have them run localstre.am in a clustered setup. Not bad for a week of tinkering but I’m pretty sure I could have gotten to that point without puppet as well (possibly sooner even). And, I still have a lot of work to do to setup a wide range of things that I would have hoped would be solved problems (logging, backups, firewalls, chroot, load balancing a bog standard, stateless http server, etc). Most of this falls in the category of non value adding stuff that somebody simply has to do. Given that we are a two person company and I’m the CTO/server guy, that would be me.

I of course have the benefit of hindsight from my career in Nokia where I watched Nokia waste/invest tens of millions on deploying simple bog standard Java applications (mostly) to servers for a few years. It seems simple things like “given a war file, deploy the damn thing to a bunch of machines” get very complicated when you grow the number of people involved. I really want to avoid needing a forty people ops team to do stupid shit like that.

So, I cut some corners. My time is limited and my bash skills are adequate enough that I basically only use puppet to get the OS in a usable enough state that I can hand off to to a bash script to do the actual work of downloading, untarring, chmodding, etc. needed to  get our application running. Not very puppet like but at least it gets the job done in 40 lines of code or so without intruding too much on my time. In those 40 lines, I install the latest sun jdk (tar ball), latest jruby (another tar ball), our code base, and the two scripts to start elastic search and our jetty/mizuno based app server.

What would be actually useful is reusable machine templates for bog standard things like php and ruby capable servers, java tomcat servers, apache load balancers, etc with sensible hardened configurations, logging, monitoring, etc. The key benefit would be inheriting from a sensible setup and only changing the bits that actually need changing. It seems that is too much to ask for at this point and consequently hundreds of thousands of system administrators (or the more hipster devops if you are so inclined) continue to be busy creating endless minor variations of the same systems.

Disabling swap file

I have an imac from 2009. At the time, I maxed out the memory to a whopping 4GB. This may not seem much these days but it is still plenty for most things.

Over time, my disk has gotten a bit fragmented, applications have gotten a bit heavier (e.g. Firefox commonly uses well over a GB), and things have gotten a little slower.

I had already half decided to buy a new mac to ‘solve’ this problem by simply getting the latest model and maxing out the RAM. The only problem is that Apple seems to be dragging their heels refreshing their iMac line, which is now more than a year old (ancient basically). So, I’ll have to survive for a bit and figure out how to do that until they get around to fixing that.

Basically the primary reason for slowness on macs is swapping. You may think you have enough RAM, and you may in fact have plenty of available RAM. It doesn’t matter, your mac will swap applications to disk even when you don’t need the memory. That takes time. Especially on fragmented disks. Basically on my machine it got to a point where the disk would be churning for minutes every time I opened applications and there was considerable lag when switching applications that I had already opened. All this despite still having a full GB of memory available. So even though I am nowhere close to running out of memory, the OS decides to spend time swapping stuff to and from disk almost constantly. Reason: it was designed well over a decade ago during a time when 16MB was massive amount of memory. I have about 250x that amount.

I found this nice post explaining how to turn swapping off (you have to reboot for this to work). Now there are all sorts of reasons why swapping and virtual memory are good things in theory and all sorts of advice warning that all sorts of evil things can and will happen if you mess with it.

Consider yourself warned.

There are also people claiming that swapping “improves performance”. The latter point is of course massive bull shit: how does using a massively slower disk help make things faster compared to only using RAM, which has massively better bandwidth and latency?. There are also loads of people confusing virtual memory and swap space whining that applications won’t run without virtual memory. Virtual memory is the notion that applications have access to a memory space that is much larger than the available RAM. On a 64 bit machine, this typically is way more than the capacity of your disk or indeed most storage solutions (think a couple of hundred TB).

Swap space on the other hand is used for temporarily swapping memory to disk that has actually been allocated and is in use by some application to free it up for some other application. I.e. you don’t swap virtual memory but only memory that is actually used. So, swapping is only useful when you need more RAM than you have and when you somehow prefer to not close applications and instead have their memory written to disk and read from disk when you switch between them.

Provided you have enough RAM to run all the applications that you need, this should be exactly never. On servers this is the reason you generally turn swapping off because by the time you need it, your server is dead anyway. On desktops, the same argument can be used, provided you can fit your applications into memory comfortably.

So, I turned off swapping on my mac a few days ago and was rewarded with a massive reduction in disk activity and nearly full restoration of the performance I enjoyed when this machine was still new and 4GB was four times what you actually needed. I call that a huge win.

Now, there is one caveat: modern operating systems run hundreds of processes. Those processes use memory. Nasty things happen if it cannot be allocated. The price of running out of memory is that random processes may crash and fail. If that happens to a critical process, your entire OS becomes unstable and you may have to reboot. Solution: make sure you don’t run out of memory. The good news is that normally you shouldn’t run out of memory except when running buggy software with memory leaks or when running a lot of software or software with extreme memory needs (e.g. Adobe Aperture or some games). A little awareness about what is running goes a long way to avoiding any trouble.

I routinely have Firefox open with a few dozen tabs, spotify, skype, a terminal, eclipse, and maybe preview and a few other small things. With all that open, I’m still below 3GB. That leaves about 1 GB for file caches, misc other OS needs, and a little bandwidth to open extra applications. If I run low on memory, or suspect that I will, I simply close a few applications.

I used to do this with windows XP as well and only recall a hand full of cases where applications crashed because they ran out of memory. Well worth the price for a vast increase in performance. Turning off swapping on old PCs is pretty much a no brainer and especially on new ones with way more memory than you need (and considering memory prices, why would you run with less …), I cannot possibly imagine any scenario where swapping adds any value whatsoever but I guess it would be a nice fallback solution as a last resort when the only alternative would be for applications to crash. Unfortunately, neither macs nor windows pcs have a setting that would enable that. So, turning off swapping entirely is the next best thing.

Google Go

Like every week there were the usual announcements of new stuff from Google this week. Highlight this week must be the experimental language Go. My initial response, not hindered by any knowledge about what Go is about, was: yet another language, why bother? I watched the rather interesting techtalk about this new language and I have a bit more insight now. My initial response is still prevailing, but I can see how Go could influence things in the right direction since it does do a few cool things.

Things I like about Go:

  • Channels and “go routines” aka. jobs or threads if you insist (not necessarily the OS supported ones) supported in the language, this is the essential superglue needed for parallel computing. The only mainstream language that comes close so far here is erlang, which is not exactly very popular but is being applied successfully for e.g. xmpp implementations. Anybody who has ever done any programming involving threads should be able to see the benefit of these features. I need this, yesterday.
  • Interfaces and typing. Any interface declared is automatically a type of anything that implements its contents. This is a useful formalization of duck typing (if it walks & talks like a duck, it must be a duck) that I haven’t really seen elsewhere other than scripting languages. It’s a bit of a philosophical thing. Should objects describe themselves, or or should an outsider be able to classify the world? Go takes the outsider point of view and basically allows programmers to treat objects as a Duck if they implement a quack() method. Like it or not, concepts like casting, the friendly keyword in C and untyped languages exist because of this. Go doesn’t need those.
  • Orthogonal & KISS design of the language where things can be combined freely. Some pretty cool stuff was demoed with channels, consts and other language features being combined to do pretty complicated stuff in the above linked techtalk. Separation of concern is highly useful, as any good software designer knows, and the right thing to have at the language level.
  • Implicit typing of arbitrary precision numbers, floats, etc. This is a brilliant idea. Prematurely narrowing down the precision of your floats, ints, and what not is a source of bugs. Leave it up to the compiler to figure out the right precision and leave it to static code analysis tools to identify potential performance bottlenecks that might result from this.

What I don’t like:

  • C-like syntax & weird syntax for types. C syntax was never that great (without macros, C would be unusable) and essentially most of the details were bolted on over time. Preserving the error prone & and * notations is in my view a big mistake, as are several other C constructs. They are an open invitation for programmers to make extremely hard to find mistakes.
  • Lack of generics, although they are working on a solution here apparently. Like it or not, meta programming and related subjects are enabled by this key feature. Too important to omit nowadays.
  • Yet another vm/runtime and no support for JVM, .Net, llvm, or similar run-times. In my view native is overrated (relative to dynamic compilation) and I don’t buy the “runs within 10-20% of native C code” claim (what about optimizations & 40 years of compiler tweaking?). But I’m sure that is true for the trivial code that has so far been written in Go. As is the case for trivial Java code, which under controlled circumstances kicks some ass relative to any statically compiled language BTW. But show me some real software doing real stuff.
  • Burn everything and start from scratch approach to libraries. Is that really necessary? Seriously, I spent the past few days sorting out the dependencies to external libraries I have in a ‘simple’ java project (i.e. updating to more recent versions, pruning unused stuff). Contrary to the popular belief, some of those ~50 direct and transitive dependencies do some really useful things and are not just bloat. 5000 lines of Java + a few hundred thousand LOC in dependencies is hard to beat with a new language plus ~100KLOC worth of libraries. Any productivity gains would be wiped out by having to reinvent a lot of wheels. Not necessary in my view.
  • The nineteen seventies architecture for compiler and run-time. As I outlined in my last post, I believe compilation is fundamentally a run-time optimization these days. With Go, the compilation work is allegedly light to begin with due to the wise decision to keep the language simple. So why bother at all with compiling and why not just leave things to the run-time to figure out when you actually run the code? Integrate the compiler into the run-time and remove compilation as a concern for developers.

In short, nice concepts but I don’t see the need for tearing down everything we have and starting from scratch. Basically this language is scala + a couple of tweaks and minus all of the integration work and maturity. There are lots of contenders in this space and Go is just yet another one. They probably should have called it E since it is just repeating the mistakes of C, C++, and D but is not quite the same as F#.

N900 & Slashdot

I just unleashed the stuff below in a slashdot thread. 10 years ago I was a regular there (posting multiple times per day) and today I realized that I hadn’t actually even bothered to sign into slashdot since buying a mac a few months ago. Anyway, since I spent time writing this I might as well repost here. On a side note, they support OpenID for login now! Cool!

…. The next-gen Nokia phone [arstechnica.com] on the other hand (successor to the N900) will get all the hardware features of the iPhone, but with the openness of a linux software stack. Want to make an app that downloads podcasts? Fine! Want to use your phone as a modem? No problem! In fact, no corporation enforcing their moral or business rules on how you use your phone, or alienation of talented developers [macworld.com]!

You might make the case that the N900 already has the better hardware when you compare it to the iphone. And for all people dismissing Nokia as just a hardware company, there’s tons of non trivial Nokia IPR in the software stack as well (not all OSS admittedly), that provides lots of advantages in the performance or energy efficiency domain; excellent multimedia support (something a lot of smart phones are really bad at), hardware acceleration, etc. Essentially most vendors ship different combinations of chips coming from a very small range of companies so from that point of view it doesn’t really matter what you buy. The software on top makes all the difference and the immaturity of newer platforms such as Android can be a real deal breaker when it comes to e.g. battery life, multimedia support, support for peripherals, etc. There’s a difference between running linux on a phone and running it well. Nokia has invested heavily in the latter and employs masses of people specialized in tweaking hardware and software to get the most out of the hardware.

But the real beauty of the N900 for the slashdot crowd is simply the fact that it doesn’t require hacks or cracks: Nokia actively supports & encourages hackers with features, open source developer tools, websites, documentation, sponsoring, etc. Google does that to some extent with Android but the OS is off limits for normal users. Apple actively tries to stop people from bypassing the appstore and is pretty hostile to attempts to modify the OS in ways they don’t like. Forget about other platforms. Palm technically uses linux but they are still keeping even the javascript + html API they have away from users. It might as well be completely closed source. You wouldn’t know the difference.

On the other hand, the OS on the N900 is Debian. Like on Debian, the package manager is configured in /etc/sources.list which is used by dpkg and apt-get, which work just as you would expect on any decent Debian distribution. You have root access, therefore you can modify any file, including sources.list. Much of Ubuntu actually compiles with little or no modification and most of the problems you are likely to encounter relate to the small screen size. All it takes to get to that software is pointing your phone at the appropriate repositories. There was at some point a Nokia sponsored Ubuntu port to ARM even, so there is no lack of stuff that you can install. Including stuff that is pretty pointless on a smart phone (like large parts of KDE). But hey, you can do it! Games, productivity tools, you name it and there probably is some geek out there who managed to get it to build for Maemo. If you can write software and package it as a Debian package and can cross compile it to ARM (using the excellent OSS tooling of course), there’s a good chance it will just work.

So, you can modify the device to your liking at a level no other mainstream vendor allows. Having a modifiable Debian linux system with free access to all of the OS on top of what is essentially a very compact touch screen device complete with multiple radios (bluetooth, 3G, wlan), sensors (GPS, motion, light, sound), graphics, dsp, should be enough to make any self respecting geek drool.

Now with the N900 you get all of that, shipped as a fully functional smart phone with all of the features Nokia phones are popular for such as excellent voice quality and phone features, decent battery life (of course with all the radios turned on and video & audio playing none stop, your mileage may vary), great build quality and form factor, good support for bluetooth and other accessories, etc. It doesn’t get more open in the current phone market currently and this is still the largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world.

In other words, Nokia is sticking out its neck for you by developing and launching this device & platform while proclaiming it to be the future of Nokia smart phones. It’s risking a lot here because there are lots of parties in the market that are in the business of denying developers freedom and securing exclusive access to mobile phone software. If you care about stuff like this, vote with your feet and buy this or similarly open (suggestions anyone?) devices from operators that support instead of prevent you from doing so. If Nokia succeeds here, that’s a big win for the OSS community.

Disclaimer: I work for Nokia and I’m merely expressing my own views and not representing my employer in any way. That being said, I rarely actively promote any of our products and I choose to do so with this one for one reason: I believe every single word of it.

Totaled my Porsche

As you might recall I bought a pair of Lacie Porsche 500GB disks some time ago. Well, a few weeks ago the power supply of one of them began making funny noises and it was getting harder to start up the Porsche. The disk worked fine with the power supply that came with the other drive so the problem was that the power supply was broken.

This happened just outside the warranty of the disk. So the fix was to order a new power supply from Lacie. I looked up how to do that on the website and discovered that these things cost around 35€ which is quite a lot to invest in a disk that now sells under 100€. Besides, I’m kind of annoyed with all those bricks below my desk anyway.

So I went for option number two: pry open the casing and put the disk in the PC. Thanks to this post, I figured out how to do this. Unfortunately, I did end up making a few scratches on the plastic. It is indeed quite tricky to do this properly. But I’m not going to use it anyway.

A quick look in the windows disk properties confirmed that my disk indeed was a sata disk (a samsung). So I took apart my PC, plugged the disk in and put everything together (after a short trip to the store for a second SATA cable). For some reason the first drive was plugged into the second SATA port so after boot, it couldn’t find the OS. A quick trip to the bios allowed me to swap which drive is treated as the first disk and I was back in business.

Let me know if you have a use for a empty Lacie Porsche case with some minor scratches and without a power supply (you can take the broken one of course). You should be able to put in any SATA disk. For 5€ or a (nice) beer it is yours.

Modular windows

There is a nice article on Ars discussing Microsoft’s business practices regarding windows and how they appear to be not quite working lately. It used to be that your PC came with windows whereas nowadays you have to select from a around five different versions and Microsoft is rumored to go to an even more modular and subscription based model. The general idea is to be able to squeeze out as much revenue out of the market as possible. On paper it sounds good (for MS that is).

Rather than buying an overpriced OS with everything and the kitchen sink you buy what you need. There’s a huge differences between what businesses and some individuals are willing to spend and the typical home user that just wants a browser + skype + the sims. Typically the latter group ends up buying the cheapo version and the former group ends up buying the everything and the kitchen sink version. The problem is that there is unmonetized value in the latter in the sense that some owners of the  cheapo versions might be interested in getting access to some of those features in the expensive version but not in all of them.

Now to the obvious problem with the discussed solution. By selling cheapo versions with most of the value removed and factored out into separate chunks you have to pay for, you dilute the overall value of the OS. So instead of buying an OS that can do X, Y, and Z out of the box you are buying an OS that can’t do X, Y, and Z out of the box. Marketing an OS that can’t do stuff is a lot harder than trying to sell stuff that can do things.  Worse they are opening the market to third parties that might do something similar to X, Y, and Z for a better price, or in some cases for free (beer & speech). Or even worse to companies selling an alternative OS with X, Y, and Z.

That in a nutshell is what is discussed in the Ars article and why Apple Mac OS X marketshare is approaching double digit percentages. I’ve been giving it some serious thought lately and I’m also noticing the spike in Safari users in my web site statistics.

Anyway, the reason for this write up is that the article overlooks an important argument here that I believe is relevant for more markets than just operating systems. In general, the tie between OS and features such as photo galleries, online backups, or TV UIs is artificial. Microsoft only adds features like this to make the overall OS more valuable. That is, they are looking to improve the value of the OS, not the photo gallery. However, ongoing and inevitable commoditization of software actually shifts value to new features. Especially when bundled with online subscriptions, things like online photo galleries can be quite good business. For example, Flickr has many paying subscribers.

Naturally MS is interested in markets like this (which is why they are interested in Yahoo). However, the tie-in to the OS constrains the market. Why would you not want to sell these services to Apple users? Why would you not want to sell this service to Sony Playstation owners? Why would you want to want to artificially limit who can access your service just to boost sales of your OS? As long as you were trying to artificially (and apparently for MS illegally) boost value of your core OS, bundling was a valid strategy. However, as soon as your value shifts, that becomes a brake on market growth. The OS market has commoditized to the point where you can get things like Ubuntu for free, which for the low end market is about as good as what you get with the cheapo version of Vista (see my various reviews of Ubuntu for why I’m not ready to claim better yet).

So the difference between MS and Google who is eating their lunch in the services arena is that the latter is not handicapped by 20 years of Windows legacy and can freely innovate and grow marketshare without having to worry about maintaining a revenue stream from legacy software. Google doesn’t have to sell OS licenses and so they give away software on all platforms to draw more users to their services which is where they make their money.

Naturally, Google has a lot of software engineers that are working round the clock to create more value for them. Where possible Google actively collaborates with the open source community because they know that while they won’t make any money from commodities like browsers, file systems and other important software components, they do depend on those things working as good as possible and keep evolving in the right direction. Few people appreciate this but this and not ads is why Google sponsors Firefox. It’s a brilliant strategy and it is forcing their main competitor to keep investing in internet explorer rather than being able to shift resources to directly competing with Google. 50 million $ is pocket money if it is making your main competitor crap their pants and waste resources on keeping up with you in a market where you are not even trying to make money.

You might have noticed that I have carefully avoided discussing Google and Microsoft’s mobile service strategies and also noticed that yours truly is working for Nokia. Well, my readers ought to be smart enough to figure out what I’m trying to say here aren’t you :-)?

websites and stupid assumptions

I just went to a blog and wanted to leave a comment. So the site redirects to blogger.com where I can leave a comment. The site correctly detects I am located in Finland. Very good! That’s so clever! Amazing what you can do these days!

The only problem is that like most of this world (barring around 4-5 million native speakers) I don’t speak Finnish. Not a word. Really, I have a coffee mug that lists pretty much all knowledge I have of this beautiful but incomprehensible language. I haven’t even managed to memorize most of that. And somehow I don’t believe “maksa makkara” (pay the sausage?) is going to help me here.

So, no problem, lots of sites make this mistake. Just click the little “gimme the english version” link that surely must be hidden somewhere …. missing in action. So I check the url …. no obvious way to change fi to en there either. Maybe on the frontpage …. nope, www.blogger.com insists on Finnish as well. So www.blogger.com is unusable for me. Lets just hope it doesn’t spread to the rest of the world. That would be really annoying.

Anyway, this assumption of setting the language based on IP address is just stupid and wrong. First of all, the site should respect my browser settings: doesn’t list Finnish, at all. Neither does my OS. And the browser sends this information as part of the http headers so you can know that my preferred language is US-en. Secondly, Finland is bilingual and for some 500.000 people the right language would have been Swedish. I happen to speak some Swedish at least. And finally any modern country like Finland has a large number of travelers, tourists and migrant workers like me. So not offering a way out is just stupid. Confronting hundreds of thousands of users (just in Finland) with the wrong language when each of them is providing you with their preferred language is even more stupid. Additionally, not offering a link for English is just retarded.

spyware sucks, but ubuntu doesn’t

Last weekend (Easter holiday, long weekend) was a good opportunity to visit my parents in the Netherlands. Apart from beloved son, I’m also their system administrator. Last time I made a mistake, I left them behind with a partially secured windows machine. The thing was behind a router and they were using firefox (saw to that personally). Anyway, when I checked this weekend the machine was full of very nasty spyware. It was basically unusable and the spyware interfered with normal usage of the machine.
I tried to fix it using the usual tools (adaware, spybot) but this did not work 100%. Both tools managed (on multiple attempts) to identify and remove a shitload of spyware. But the remaining few managed to ‘fix’ this as soon as they were done. Eventually I thought the machine was clean but then the rebooting started. After booting everything would look allright, and then it would reboot. Effectively I only had a few minutes to figure out what was going on before this happened. That gets old real quick.
That was roughly when I decided to bring the laptop home and start from scratch. Of course before doing so, I have to make an attempt to back up my parent’s files and family photos. Accessing the laptop in its current state is pretty much impossible, hence the title of this post. I stand corrected: ubuntu does not suck after all. It’s merely very unsuitable for end users :-).

A few weeks back I posted my not so positive review of ubuntu. Currently I’m using it to rescue some files. I won’t bother trying to actually install it on the laptop for my parents. The main reason is that I have a hard enough job supporting my parents without them having to learn an entirely new OS. After years of practice they can sort of do things by himself now. Things like burning a cd, editing photos, doing banking, etc. I have no desire to start from scratch with them on all of that.

But the point is that it would work very well. I booted into the live dvd image. I actually mistook the dvd for my knoppix cd. I was pleasantly surprised to find a booted ubuntu desktop when I came back. All hardware, including smc pcmcia wireless card, onboard sound and display had been recognized. The wireless card needed to be configured for my network, which was easy once I had found the tool. Confusingly there is a system and administration menu that both contain network related tools.

Then I had to mount the ntfs partition. I tried to use the disk tool but it is useless (you can mount but not access the partition unless you are root which is not very convenient in ubuntu where you can’t log in as root). I had to do some googling to make the correct changes to fstab manually and then proceeded to mount using the good old commandline. That worked. Then I sshed (using nautilus) into my windows box (which runs cygwin) and I’m currently uploading some crucial files. After that completes, I’ll wipe the laptop and be sure to lock it down properly this time.

lessons learned:

  • no auto update + no firewall + unsecured wlan = very bad idea
  • firefox + router != enough protection
  • adaware and spybot are not good enough for recovery, these are fine prevention tools however
  • ubuntu doesn’t suck, it’s a nice addition to any system administrators toolbox 🙂