OpenID, the identity landscape, and social networks

I’m still getting used to no longer being in nokia research center. One of my disappointments of being in NRC and being a vocal proponent of openid, social networks, etc. was that despite lots of discussion on this topic not much has happened in terms of me getting room to work on these topics or me convincing a lot of people about my opinions on these topics. I have one publication that is due out whenever the magazine involved gets around to approving and printing the article. But that’s it.

So, I take great pleasure in observing how things are evolving lately and finding that I’ve been pushing the right topics all along. Earlier this week, Facebook became a relying party for OpenID. Outside the OpenID community and regular techcrunch readers, this seems to have not been a major news story. Since, just about anybody I discussed this topic with in the past few years (you know who you are) always insisted that “no way that a major network like Facebook will ever use OpenID”. If you were one of those people: admit right now that you were wrong.

It seems to me that this is a result of fact that the social networking landscape is maturing. As part of this maturation process, several open standards are emerging. Identity and authentication are very important topics here and it seems the consensus is increasingly that no single company is going to own all 6-7 billion identities on this planet. So naturally any company with the ambition to potentially separate 6-7 billion individuals from their money for some product or service, will need to either work with multiple identity providers.

So naturally such companies require a standard for doing so. That standard is OpenID. It has no competition. There is no alternative. There are plenty of proprietary APIs that only work with limited sets of identity providers but none like OpenID that can work with all of them.

Similarly, major identity providers like Google, Facebook are stuck at sharing a few hundred million users between them, they shift their attention to somehow involving all those users that didn’t sign up with them. Pretty much all of them are OpenID providers already. Facebook just took the obvious next step in becoming a relying party as well. The economics are mindbogglingly simple: Facebook doesn’t make money from verifying peoples identity but they do make money from people using their services. OpenID relying party means the group of people who can access their services just grew to the entire internet population. Why wouldn’t they want that? Of course this doesn’t mean that world + dog will now be a Facebook user but it does mean that one important obstacle has just disappeared.

BTW. Facebook’s current implementation is not very intuitive. I’ve been able to hook up myopenid to my facebook account but I haven’t actually found a login page where I can login with my openid yet. It seems that this is a work in progress still.

Anyway, this concludes my morning blogging session. Haven’t blogged this much in months. Strange how the prospect of not having to work today is energizing me 🙂

The Way We Live Next

I stumbled upon somebody writing about Nokia’s 2007 Way We Live Next event in Oulu. This event was intended to give the outside world a view on what is going on in Nokia Research Center.

Nice quote

Lots of interesting stuff was shown off during the course of the two days and the most interesting I came across was the indoor positioning concept. Using WiFi and specially created maps, the devices we were issued with were running the software which enabled you to move through the NRC building and pinpoint exactly where you were. So, if the next presentation was in room 101, the device would simply, and quickly show you the way. It instantly made me think of the frustration of trying to get where I want in huge shopping centres – and I figured this had to be the perfect solution.

Next week, the 2008 edition of the WWLN is going to be in Espoo and I will be giving a demo there of our indoor location based service platform, customized for a real shopping mall. We’ve demoed last years version of our software platform at the Internet of Things Conference last April. At the time our new platform was already under development for a several months and we are getting ready to start trialing it now. The WWLN event next week will be when we first show this in public and hopefully we’ll get some nice attention from the press on this.

PS. I like (good) beer …

Paper on Sensor Actuator Kit evaluation

One of our interns, Filip Suba, presented a paper earlier this week in Turku at the Symposium on Applications & the Internet. He’s one of my former (since today) master thesis students that has been working in our team at NRC for the past few months. The paper he presented is actually based on his work a few months before that when he was working for us as a summer trainee (previous summer that is). His master thesis work (on a nice new security protocol) is likely to result in another paper, when we find the time to write it.

Anyway, we hired him last year to learn a bit more about the state of the art in Sensor Actuator development kit with a particular focus on building applications and services that are kit independent and exposing their internals via a web API. This proved quite hard and we wrote a nice paper on our experiences.

In short, wireless sensor actuator kits are a mess. Above the radio level very little is standardized and the little there is is rarely interoperable. Innovation here is very rapid though. The future looks bright though. I watched this nice video about Sun Spot earlier this week for example:

The notion of making writing on Sensor node software as simple as creating a J2ME Midlet is in my view quite an improvement over hacking C using some buggy toolkit, cross compiling to obscure hardware and hoping it works.