Scrum: Agile madness

Like most in our industry I’ve been exposed to agile, scrum and related hypes over the past decade. Unlike most in our industry, I have a little bit of background in software engineering research as well. During my Ph. D., which was in the early days of agile when Kent Beck published his book on extreme programming and I was writing my thesis on software architecture, I had the privilege of seeing a lot of different companies from the inside and talked to tech leads, architects and other leaders across a nice range of companies doing software product development. Ultimately after wrapping up my thesis, I decided that I lacked the experience to speak authoritatively on the subject of software development and moved over to the software industry to get some experience.

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Agile methods

Another interesting article by Martin Fowler: The New Methodology (and again I’m several months late). The predecessor of this article in 2000 was equally interesting. In fact it still is. If you have the time, read both of them.

Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, Erich Gamma and other people of that generation have greatly influenced the way I think about software engineering. I’ve been a scholar in software engineering and currently my work at Nokia also involves a great deal of software engineering research. I see these guys as the pragmatic force driving the industry forward. While we scholars are babbling about Model Driven Architectures, Architecture Description Languages, etc.in our ivory towers, these guys are all “stuff and no fluff”. It’s a good thing to once in a while consider that many of the software engineering research community ideas and concepts in the past have done and continue to do a lot of damage. For example, the waterfall model (the mother of all software development methodology) is still being taught in universities. Out of touch SE teachers still teach their students to do things one after the other (instead of iteratively).

The original papers on the waterfall model, iterative development and related methodology from the seventies are an interesting read. Their authors had a lot more vision than past and present proponents of these methods. But they are just that: the vision of software developers coming out of the cold in the seventies. We’ve learned a lot since.

If there’s one thing you can learn from Martin Fowler, Kent Beck or Alistair Cockburn, it is that you should never ever implement their methodology to the letter. If you are doing so, you didn’t get it. Agile is all about change, including changing the way you work on permanent basis. The article I’m citing presently argues this in Martin Fowler’s usual clear fashion. Go read it already.